Category

Conference

Community Informatics Virtual Webinar Series

By Conference, Events, ResearchNo Comments

The Community Informatics Research Network (CIRN), Monash University, and the Community Informatics Lab at Simmons University are thrilled to announce the Community Informatics Virtual Webinar Series, which is a multi-part live webinar series held between October 19th – November 16th, 2020.

The CI Virtual Webinar Series will invite conversations that explore the history, impact, and present day importance of the fields of Community Informatics, Community Archives, Development Informatics, and related fields. This series will cover a wide range of themes that reflect the richness and diversity of these fields. You can register for the series on the Seminar web page. A snapshot schedule of the seminars are as follows:

  • October 19th: The Informatics of Mutual Aid
  • October 26th: ICT4D: Beyond ICT
  • November 2nd: Indigenous Archives Collective
  • November 9th: Globalization, Power, and Community Empowerment
  • November 16th: Memorialization, Digital Media, and the State

The webinar series will take the place of the CIRN 2020 annual conference, which has been cancelled due to the novel coronavirus. We are excited for the 2021 conference in Prato, Italy, which will surround the theme of “Participatory Approaches to Community Archives, Data, and Design.” You can find out more about the 2021 conference here. In the meantime, the 2020 CI Virtual Webinar series offers a new and exciting opportunity to stay engaged with the global CI community while we are practicing social distancing.

Join our newsletter and follow the @JournalofCI and @CommInfoLab on Twitter for updates on the CI Virtual Webinar Series and other CI related news.

17th CIRN Proceedings

New Paper Published in CIRN Conference Proceedings

By Conference, Publications, Research, UncategorizedNo Comments

17th CIRN ProceedingsCI Lab Director, Dr. Colin Rhinesmith, Jo Dutilloy, and Susan Kennedy have a new paper in the 17th Community Informatics Research Network Conference proceedings, which are now available on the Monash University website. The Conference Proceedings were co-edited by Larry Stillman and Misita Anwar (Monash University) along with Colin and Vanessa Rhinesmith.

The paper, titled “Co-Designing an Open Source Broadband Measurement System with Public Libraries” was co-authored with several colleagues involved in the  IMLS grant funded research project, “Measuring Library Broadband Networks” grant (award #LG-71-18-0110-18).

Here is the abstract:

This paper presents findings from a participatory design workshop with public librarians and information technology practitioners to gain their insights on the development of an open source broadband measurement system for public libraries across the United States. Participatory design has been a key strategy in community informatics to engage users in the design, implementation, and evaluation of information and community technology (ICT). This engagement assumes that those most impacted by ICTs should be involved in making decisions about how these technologies are developed. While findings from previous studies have shown the value of using participatory design in community informatics projects, fewer studies have investigated how such design processes might be used to develop open-source technology systems with public libraries. Our study seeks to address this gap in the literature by focusing heavily on the participatory design elements in our data collection and analysis. Findings from our qualitative analysis of the workshop data reveal that public libraries want more knowledge of their broadband networks to better communicate with their patrons, respond to their communities’ digital needs, and justify the importance of robust internet connectivity to their funders. We believe these findings show the value of using participatory design in community informatics with public libraries, as well as the benefits of sharing co-design techniques with researchers and practitioners in the field.”

The full text of the paper is available for download here.

New JoCI Editor-In-Chief

By Conference, Journals, Publications, ResearchNo Comments

I am honored and excited to announce that beginning March 1, 2020 I will be beginning my new role as Editor-In-Chief of The Journal of Community Informatics taking over for Eduardo Villanueva. The announcement was first made last November at the annual Community Informatics Research Network (CIRN) conference at the Monash Centre in Prato, Italy. I am currently working with Eduardo to begin the transfer of the journal’s responsibilities over this coming month. I hope to open the journal back up for submissions beginning in March 2020. Stay tuned for updates here at the new website for the Community Informatics Lab @ SLIS.

Co-Edited JoCI Special Issue Published

By Conference, Journals, PublicationsNo Comments

The new issue of The Journal of Community Informatics was published this past week. I had the opportunity to co-edit the special issue with David Nemer (University of Kentucky) and Christiana Urbano (Simmons). The issue features selections from the 2016 Community Informatics Research Network Conference in Prato, Italy.

Here’s an excerpt from our introduction to the special issue:

The conference theme was “Engaging with Participation, Activism, and Technologies.” The papers in this issue highlight the conference’s overarching theme, which focused on advancing theory and practice in the development of Participatory Action Research (PAR) with a particular focus on helping to ensure that marginalized groups have a strong voice in their communities in the face of structural and cultural challenges. In doing so, the conference sought to help promote “a stronger focus on more meaningful and equal partnerships with community, civil society, and NGO organisations around the world.”

 

TPRC Paper Selected for Capitol Hill Briefing

By Conference, Digital Inclusion, ResearchNo Comments

I am honored and excited to announce that my paper with Dr. Bianca Reisdorf, Assistant Professor in Media and Information and Quello Center Assistant Director at Michigan State University, has been selected as one of four papers to be presented at a special Telecom Policy Congressional Briefing as part of this year’s Telecommunications Policy Research Conference.

Here’s a snippet of the announcement via the Quello Center’s website:

Dr. Reisdorf will present findings from her work with Dr. Colin Rhinesmith, who is an Assistant Professor at Simmons College, and a Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. In their paper, titled Race and Digital Inequality: Policy Implications, they combined quantitative data analyses using Pew data, American Community Survey data, and FCC Form 477 data with qualitative data from a Benton Foundation study on digital inclusion initiatives in several cities across the US. The combination of these rich data sources brought forward deeper insights into what is keeping some of the economically hardest-hit communities offline and how policy can help increase digital equity. For example, quantitative analyses of data on Kansas City, MO, and Kansas City, KS,emphasized existing digital inequalities along factors such as race, income, and education, and showed that fewer fixed broadband providers offer their services in poor urban neighborhoods. The qualitative case study of digital inclusion initiatives across these neighborhoods, however, showed that local, well-designed digital equity programs have a positive impact in mitigating these inequalities. While federal policies can help to provide more infrastructure and service to hard-hit neighborhoods through programs such as Lifeline, local organizations and policymakers can provide context-specific on-the-ground support that builds on the resources and assets already available in the communities to allow meaningful broadband adoption.

Visit the TPRC website to learn more about this year’s conference in Washington, D.C.

 

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