New Paper Published in CIRN Conference Proceedings

By June 4, 2020June 23rd, 2020Conference, Publications, Research, Uncategorized

17th CIRN ProceedingsCI Lab Director, Dr. Colin Rhinesmith, Jo Dutilloy, and Susan Kennedy have a new paper in the 17th Community Informatics Research Network Conference proceedings, which are now available on the Monash University website. The Conference Proceedings were co-edited by Larry Stillman and Misita Anwar (Monash University) along with Colin and Vanessa Rhinesmith.

The paper, titled “Co-Designing an Open Source Broadband Measurement System with Public Libraries” was co-authored with several colleagues involved in the  IMLS grant funded research project, “Measuring Library Broadband Networks” grant (award #LG-71-18-0110-18).

Here is the abstract:

This paper presents findings from a participatory design workshop with public librarians and information technology practitioners to gain their insights on the development of an open source broadband measurement system for public libraries across the United States. Participatory design has been a key strategy in community informatics to engage users in the design, implementation, and evaluation of information and community technology (ICT). This engagement assumes that those most impacted by ICTs should be involved in making decisions about how these technologies are developed. While findings from previous studies have shown the value of using participatory design in community informatics projects, fewer studies have investigated how such design processes might be used to develop open-source technology systems with public libraries. Our study seeks to address this gap in the literature by focusing heavily on the participatory design elements in our data collection and analysis. Findings from our qualitative analysis of the workshop data reveal that public libraries want more knowledge of their broadband networks to better communicate with their patrons, respond to their communities’ digital needs, and justify the importance of robust internet connectivity to their funders. We believe these findings show the value of using participatory design in community informatics with public libraries, as well as the benefits of sharing co-design techniques with researchers and practitioners in the field.”

The full text of the paper is available for download here.

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